Short Assessment Grading: Add or Average?

Long assessments can waste precious class time unless there is much material to be assessed, but shorter assessments (with few questions) can cause small errors to have too big an impact on a student’s grade.

For example, consider the following assessment lengths where each question is worth 4 points, and the student has a total of two points subtracted from their score for errors:

# Questions Points % % Grade
1 2 / 4 50% F / F
2 6 / 8 75% D / C
3 10 / 12 83% C+/ B
4 14 / 16 88% B / B+
5 18 / 20 90% B+/ A-

The “% Grade” in the table above reflects a 7-point / 10-point per letter grade approach. A one question quiz is risky for students: they could get a failing grade for losing two points on the only question. Two question quizzes are only slightly less risky. ¬†Only with three or more questions does this scenario start to minimize the risk of actively discouraging a student who loses several points.

Should quizzes therefore only have three or more questions? What if I don’t want the class to spend that much time on an assessment, or don’t have Continue reading Short Assessment Grading: Add or Average?

Unintended Consequences of a 0 – 100 Grading System

If a student makes four errors in the course of answering ten questions, what is an appropriate grade? Presumably, it would depend on the severity of the errors and the nature of the questions. Consider how your approach to grading might vary if students had been asked to:

– match ten vocabulary words to a word bank, or
– define each of ten words, then use each appropriately in a sentence

– complete ten 2-digit multiplication problems, or
– solve ten multi-step algebra problems, each requiring a unique sequence of steps

– answer ten questions similar to what they have seen for homework or in class, or
– answer ten questions unlike ones they have been asked before

Would you label each answer as right or wrong, then use percentage right as the grade?
Would you assign a number of points to each answer (if so, out of how many points per question)?
Would you assign a letter grade to each answer (whole letters only, or with +/-)?
What would you consider a “D” set of answers?
What would you consider an “A” set of answers?

Would your answers vary depending on whether you had created the assessment yourself, or were using someone else’s questions?

Many math/science teachers seem to use a percentage approach (based on total points earned or number correct) more often than any other, particularly when their school defines its letter grades using a 0 – 100 scale. Teachers of other subjects also use this scale often, but less so for “free-response” questions. While a percentage approach can work well for some assessments, it can have unintended consequences for others.

Similar Right/Wrong Questions

When asking a series of similar questions, such as Continue reading Unintended Consequences of a 0 – 100 Grading System